Will Turning Seawater Into Drinking Water Help Drought-Hit California? : NPR

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Exclusive: TSA ‘Behavior Detection’ Program Targeting Illegal Immigrants, Not Terrorists

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Now You See It

Posters from magic’s golden age

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These Disturbing Facts Will Get Stuck In Your Head

1. Because baby male chicks don’t produce eggs or grow fast or big enough to be profitable, they are tossed into a grinding machine where they meet their brutal deaths.

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I was a Republican pothead: What I learned about drug-war hypocrisy from my brush with disaster

People are suffering and dying — while our hypocritical political class allows this injustice to continue

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existential look at life–music

VIDEO

What Will Happen in Vegas Won’t Stay in Vegas [Excerpt]

Excerpted with permission from The Next Species: The 142833244341967-1Future of Evolution in the Aftermath of Man, by Michael Tennesen. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2015, Simon & Schuster.
—Of course New York City needs the microbes in the soil and the roots from the trees and plants of the Catskill Mountains to clean up its drinking water. And Central America needs mangroves, marsh grass, and coral reefs to slow down the hurricanes that can ravage its eastern coast. But what about Las Vegas? Certainly it doesn’t need nature.

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Photographer Kevin Rus train hops across the American Southwest with his iPhone

Kevin Russ hopped trains, dumpster dived for leftovers and slept in ditches as he captured the nomad lifestyle

He traveled from California to Colorado, making his way through Arizona, Texas and New Mexico

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Lauterbrunnen: The Valley of 72 Waterfalls

Tucked away in the Bernese Oberland of the Swiss Alps, about 70km southeast of Bern, lies the valley of Lauterbrunnen, regarded as one of the most beautiful valleys in Europe. The valley is about a kilometer in width, and lies between gigantic rock faces and mountain peaks that rises almost perpendicularly to heights of 300 meters from the floor of the valley. At the bottom, nestled between towering limestone precipices, lies the village of Lauterbrunnen, surrounded on three sides by the Eiger, Monch and Jungfrau Mountains. The valley, carved by receding glaciers, extends south and then turns south-westwards from the village to form a U shape.
—Lauterbrunnen means “many springs”. The name is derived from the 72 waterfalls that gush down into the valley from the vertical cliff faces, some of which are several hundred meters high. The most famous of these are the Staubbach Falls that plunges almost 300 meters, making it one of the highest in Europe formed of a single unbroken fall.

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Into the Jaws of Doors: The Open-Wide World of 11 Mouth-Shaped Portals

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What Exactly Was Joseph Mitchell Doing All Those Years at ‘The New Yorker’?

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13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CXXI)

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October 1943. “Washington, D.C. Football fans at Woodrow Wilson High School.” Photo by Esther Bubley for the Office of War Information…. via.

Defending Darwin

I’M OFTEN ASKED what I do for a living. My answer, that I am a professor at the University of Kentucky, inevitably prompts a second question: “What do you teach?” Responding to such a question should be easy and invite polite conversation, but I usually brace for a negative reaction. At least half the time the person flinches with disapproval when I answer “evolution,” and often the conversation simply terminates once the “e-word” has been spoken. Occasionally, someone will retort: “But there is no evidence for evolution.” Or insist: “It’s just a theory, so why teach it?”

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David Lynch departs…via.

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10 of the best ancient ruins … that you’ve probably never heard of | Travel | The Guardian

Done Pompeii, Ephesus and Angkor and still thirsting after archeological marvels? The founder of Timeless Travels magazine recommends 10 less well-known sites that can usually be savoured without the crowds

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It’s not just you: Americans are actually still getting poorer

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tunes just for you

The Beach Boys-Dance, Dance, Dance.mp3.

Marvin Gaye-Pride And Joy.mp3.

Judy Collins-Both Sides Now.mp3.

Chubby Checker-Let’s Twist Again.mp3.


migrant family hitch hiking

Longreads: The best longform stories on the web

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Personal cancer vaccine research ‘exciting’ say experts

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anti-American graffiti, mostly in Iran

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La Mer de Rochers

This French “sea of rocks” is packed with stunning rock formations and its own medieval castle

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Cyril Porchet photographs ornate Baroque churches around the world in his series, “Seduction.”

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Pittsburgh Pirates manager Chuck Tanner and plate umpire Jerry Crawford try to out-shout each other, during a game with the Chicago Cubs in Chicago, September 28, 1980

A General Feeling of Disorder by Oliver Sacks

Magnum Photos Newcastle Beach, New South Wales, Australia, 2000; photograph by Trent Parke
—-Nothing is more crucial to the survival and independence of organisms—be they elephants or protozoa—than the maintenance of a constant internal environment. Claude Bernard, the great French physiologist, said everything on this matter when, in the 1850s, he wrote, “La fixité du milieu intérieur est la condition de la vie libre.” Maintaining such constancy is called homeostasis. The basics of homeostasis are relatively simple but miraculously efficient at the cellular level, where ion pumps in cell membranes allow the chemical interior of cells to remain constant, whatever the vicissitudes of the external environment. More complex monitoring systems are demanded when it comes to ensuring homeostasis in multicellular organisms—animals, and human beings, in particular.

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Bunny Round-Up Time: Gene Autry

TUNE.

Fully Optioned: 1939

1939. “General Motors exhibit, Golden Gate International Exposition, San Francisco. Girls on Oldsmobile convertible coupe.” A showcase for the latest in body and chassis developments…via.

Chinese “comfort women” are photographed with their Japanese captors. Yunnan Province, Republic of China. February 1944.

The National 9 11 Memorial Museum

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Why Do So Many Young People in Latin America Hook Up in Parks?

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How our emotions transform mundane events into strong memories | Machines Like Us

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The Ten Year Apocalypse that Inspired “Interstellar” and Nearly Destroyed Midwestern America | Messy Nessy Chic

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The dystopian lake filled by the world’s tech lust

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In New Video, Congressman Explains Why His Fellow Lawmakers Couldn’t Be Trusted with NSA Oversight

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Special report: Living in denial

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The 100 Most Beautiful Words in English

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A more tolerant America?

As the nation’s headlines turn more and more to issues of tolerance — race, religion, free speech, same sex marriage — research by San Diego State University Psychology Professor Jean M. Twenge shows that Americans may be more tolerant than ever before. In a paper released this month by the journal Social Forces, Twenge, along with Nathan T. Carter and Keith Campbell from the University of Georgia, found that Americans are now more likely to believe that people with different views and lifestyles can and should have the same rights as others, such as giving a speech or teaching at a college.
—“When old social rules disappear, people have more freedom to live their lives as they want to, and Americans are increasingly tolerant of those choices,” said Twenge, who is also the author of “Generation Me.”
—“This goes beyond well-known trends such as the increasing support for gay marriage. People are increasingly saying that it’s OK for those who are different to fully participate in the community and influence everyone else.”

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The Lakes of Ubari Sand Sea

The Ubari Sand Sea is a vast area of towering sand dunes in the Fezzan region of south-western Libya. But 200,000 years ago, this was a wet and fertile region with plenty of rainfall and flowing rivers. These rivers fed a vast lake, the size of Czech Republic, in the Fezzan basin called Lake Megafezzan. During humid periods the lake reached a maximum size of 120,000 square kilometers. Climate change caused the region, a part of Sahara, to gradually dry up and between 3,000 to 5,000 years ago, the lake evaporated away into thin air. Traces of this great lake still exist today in the form of micro lakes scattered among the towering dunes like wet patches in the desert. Currently there are about 20 lakes in the Ubari Sand Sea – beautiful palm-fringed oases that appear like anomalies in the harsh desert environment.

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The Most Popular Antidepressants Are Based On An Outdated Theory [UPDATED]

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Kenya – The Big Picture

In the deadliest attack in Kenya since 1998, 147 people were killed in a horrifying rampage at Garissa University. On the day after, grieving familes waited for the remains of the victims, as many Kenyans denounced the terror.–By Leanne Burden Seidel

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California’s worst drought in 1,200 years in pictures

The governor of California has recently imposed the state’s first mandatory water restrictions, as nearly 40 million people enter the fourth year of severe drought. Farmers, business owners, and residents will be forced to cut their usage by 25% as scientists warn of the worst drought in 1,200 years.

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Charity Navigator – America’s Largest Charity Evaluator | Home

[lots of fake charities, charities that skim off most of the money for the top people and give little to the charity itself. A number of these advertise on tv, using celebrities and sad animals or wounded warriors to solicit your money…this site allows various ways to see what takes place in the world of charities]

HERE.