Francesco Pergolesi photographs small Italian shops in his series, Heroes.

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Clean eating and dirty burgers: how food became a matter of morals


The British have long associated delicious food with depraved indulgence, and now we have virtuous meals that are good for the soul. Is either attitude really healthy?

Source: Clean eating and dirty burgers: how food became a matter of morals | Life and style | The Guardian

Differences in CEO leadership style, company culture improve firm performance, study finds

Chief executive officers (CEOs) should have a different leadership style from an organization’s culture in order to improve a firm’s performance, according to researchers at Georgia State University, Arizona State University, the University of South Australia and Auckland University of Technology.
—–Based on data collected from 119 CEOs and 337 top management team members in 119 organizations in the U.S. software and hardware industries, the researchers found CEOs who adopt a leadership style similar to that of the organization’s culture have a negative impact on firm performance. Instead, firms are most effective when CEO leadership style and organizational culture are different, a discovery that contradicts widely accepted beliefs. The findings are published in The Journal of Applied Psychology.

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How a Champagne-Laden Steamship Ended Up in a Kansas Cornfield


The steamboat Arabia carried 200 tons of treasure when it sank in 1856.

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Updated Brain Map Identifies Nearly 100 New Regions


Data from 1,200 brain scans performed as part of the Human Connectome Project allowed researchers to unveil the brain’s hidden geography.

Source: Updated Brain Map Identifies Nearly 100 New Regions – The New York Times

How Salmonella Could Be Used to Kill Cancer


A genetically modified strain of the bacteria has successfully planted drugs in mice tumors.

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 Opium, Made Easy by Michael Pollan


It’s legal to buy poppy seeds in America and it’s legal to plant them—unless you’re familiar with the simple process of turning them into opium, that is. Then having poppies in your garden is a felony.

Source: Longform: Opium, Made Easy by Michael Pollan

What Scientists Mean When They Say ‘Race’ Is Not Genetic


A new paper explains why it can be dangerous to think otherwise.

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How the CIA Fuels America’s Drug Problem to Fund Covert Operations


According to a June 2016 article on Veterans Today (VT) website, the CIA not only supports the Afghanistan drug trafficking, but also designed the “Afghan

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Spectacular Caves and Rocks at Staffa Island

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The Babylonian Marriage Market: An Auction of Women in the Ancient World


In the 5th century BC, Greek Historian Herodotus wrote about the customs and traditions he witnessed while in Babylon.

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Researchers got people drunk or high, then made a fascinating discovery about how we respond


Researchers have finally figured out why you’re such a mean drunk.

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Working full-time could be bad for your brain after a certain age

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The Sweet, Awful, and Messy Results of Roommate Hookups


People tell us what it’s like when roommates stop being polite and start getting frisky.

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Brother of Belgian Terrorist Heading for the Olympics


The older brother detonated a bomb at the Brussels airport. The younger one is representing his country at the Olympic Games in Rio. The story of two Belgian siblings who long ago parted ways.

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King Philip’s War – Native American History


Find out more about the history of King Philip’s War, including videos, interesting articles, pictures, historical features and more. Get all the facts on HISTORY.com

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Beautiful Beirut before Bombed-Out Buildings were part of the Scenery


Back in 1965, it wasn’t hard to make Beirut look good. Lebanon’s capital was a playground for the jet set, visited by movie stars and millionaires alike, counting Brigitte Bardot and Peter O’Toole as regular visitors. The Beirut harbor was host to the Queen Elizabeth II cruise ship

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Curaçao’s Sweet Case of the Blues


Curaçao’s Sweet Case of the Blues–The International BlueSeas Festival—and then some.

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“Cocksucker Blues”: Robert Frank’s Suppressed Rolling Stones Documentary Comes to Film Forum


The rarely seen movie features the band onstage, backstage, and in intimate situations that hardly anybody would want to be filmed in.

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Coal-dusted portraits of WWII women railroad workers


Gritty photos capture the women who stepped in to mobilize the American war effort.

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What Happened When I Gave Up My Smartphone For A Week


Shockingly, I survived.

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Life in The Florida Keys During The 1970s


Flip Schulke (June 24, 1930, Cornish, New Hampshire; died: May 15, 2008, West Palm Beach, Florida) documented everyday life in the Florida Keys during the 1970s

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Miles of Algae and a Multitude of Hazards


Algal blooms that have recently hit southeastern Florida waters are the latest of such environmental disasters that have hit with increasing frequency.

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Spain’s Civil War and the Americans who fought in it: a convoluted legacy

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An Old Trick Holds New Promise For Tastier Tomatoes


Tomato plants grown in large scale outdoors are often selected for hardiness more than taste. What if you could boost disease resistance, flavor and yield? Researchers think they can — by grafting.

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 Hide and seek on the US-Mexico line


BBC Autos’ Jim Benning spends a day with US Customs and Border Protection agents at the world’s busiest crossing, California’s San Ysidro Port of Entry.

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How archaeologists found the lost medieval megacity of Angkor


Recent technology reconstructs the urban grid of a city overtaken by jungle.

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Here’s how you should be charging your phone, according to science

Source: READ

The 2 Big Beliefs Linked to Anxiety


Worries and fears and stress, oh my! This week, Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen reveals the two big beliefs that light up anxiety, plus how to pull the plug

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Scientist examines evolution of flight


New research undermines the ways scientists have previously attempted to explain the evolution of flight.

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Tires Recycled into Sinister and Sinewy Sculptures


Korean artist Yong Ho Ji takes recycled tires and turns them into these sculptures built on cast-iron frames.  See also the amazing creatures of the Photoshop Beastiaryvia Visual News

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Woman Paints Staircase With Her Favorite Book Covers


Pippa Branham and her husband moved to their first permanent home just last year, which meant it was finally time for Pippa to personalize their home. Her first target was the staircase.

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Circa 1928. “Mrs. Ellis’s store, Falmouth, Stafford County, Va.” Welcome to the Nicotine & Caffeine Canteen. Photo by Frances B. Johnston.

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On Friendship

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Morning Cup of Links: The Beauty of Weird Sea Creatures | Mental Floss

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6 Historical Heroes Who Did Awful Things Nobody Talks About


Every real hero had an ugly side.

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It Takes A Married Man To Sing A Worried Song_Woody Guthrie.mp3

Source: HERE

Saudi Arabia’s Role in 9/11


This might be incriminating evidence.

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Hank Williams -3 tunes

Source: Hank Williams – Take These Chains From My Heart.mp3

Source: Hank Williams – I’m Sorry For You, My Friend.mp3

Source: Hank Williams – I Won’t Be Home No More.mp3

Scientists Say These (Mostly Wild) Mammals Make the Best Pets | Mental Floss


If you’re trying to choose between a ferret and a hedgehog, go ferret.

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‘Hope is a​n embrace of the unknown​’: Rebecca Solnit on living in dark times

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We may be living through times of unprecedented change, but in uncertainty lies the power to influence the future. Now is not the time to despair, but to act

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What do we use our hands for today (and why does it matter)?

Two new books reveal intriguing aspects to today’s body politics: Darian Leader’s Hands and Fay Bound Alberti’s This Mortal Coil.
By Wendy Moore
—–You need hands, Max Bygraves sang, to hold someone you care for. But also, he might have added if he were still around today, to tap, type and scroll. From the first handprint on a cave wall through Leonardo da Vinci’s exquisite studies to M C Escher’s beguiling puzzle of two hands drawing each other, human beings have been preoccupied with their digits. Whether using tools, wielding a pen or swiping a phone, our hands seem to distinguish us from other animals.

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1946 Roberto Matta Echaurren

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Throughout Prohibition – See How These Women Used Their Sexuality to Hide the Hooch During the 1920s

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