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People absolutely horrified after finding out why chainsaws were originally invented

Ali Condon 13-17 minutes

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People are feeling pretty queasy after learning why chainsaws were first invented, and now you're about to be too.

If you've ever wondered why those contraptions that cut down trees and butcher people in horror films were originally invented, then maybe you should consider minding your own business.

Credit: Bryanston Distributing Company
Credit: Bryanston Distributing Company

No? Okay fine. The first chainsaw was originally created to help women through childbirth.

In the late 18th century, two doctors built the contraption so they could remove parts of a woman's pelvic bone to widen the birth canal in a procedure called a symphysiotomy.

Are you happy now?

Back in the day they were much smaller - around the size of a kitchen knife - and were powered by a little hand crank.

That's definitely not as threatening, but still not terribly pleasant - though neither is childbirth.

Symphysiotomies don't exactly have the cleanest history, but thankfully it's now a very outdated procedure.

You can thank the caesarian section for that.

After learning about the stomach-churning history of the chainsaw, people on TikTok were horrified.

For a while it even became a trend, where people would film themselves before and after they had googled 'why chainsaws were invented'.

TikToker @bootstheorangecat was one person who tried out the challenge, and by the looks of things she was just as horrified as I was.

And her followers weren't too happy, either.

"I WANNA GO BACK TO 5min AGO WHEN I DIDNT KNOW," wrote a second.

And a third, soon to be disgusted viewer wrote a message for her future self before setting off to look it up, writing: "Dear future me, are you alr? are you happy you know this now?"

Meanwhile, another challenger dubbed the question and answer as one of the ‘things [they] didn’t need to know in life’. That's a hard agree on my part.

But now we all know that terrible, terrible fact. Thanks for learning this with me. I hope everyone has sweet dreams.

And a third, soon to be disgusted viewer wrote a message for her future self before setting off to look it up, writing: "Dear future me, are you alr? are you happy you know this now?"

Meanwhile, another challenger dubbed the question and answer as one of the ‘things [they] didn’t need to know in life’. That's a hard agree on my part.

But now we all know that terrible, terrible fact. Thanks for learning this with me. I hope everyone has sweet dreams.

People Horrified By Scientifically Accurate Version Of Finding Nemo

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Finding Nemo is up there with some of the most memorable Pixar movies, so much so that fans still welcomed a sequel after 13 long years had passed.

Marlin's determination to track down his son and the fun - and sometimes dangerous - creatures he encountered along the way all contributed to making his journey captivating, and thankfully it all paid off when, spoiler alert, he successfully found Nemo.

The film is both heartwarming and educational - after all, you should never ignore your parents and venture beyond the reef (or the relevant area in your own life) - but unfortunately it's not very scientifically accurate.

Finding Nemo was followed by the sequel, Finding Dory. Credit: Pixar
Finding Nemo was followed by the sequel, Finding Dory. Credit: Pixar

That's not only because it features talking fish, but also because clownfish like Nemo and Marlin don't necessarily behave how they do in the film.

You might remember that Nemo's mum, Coral, dies along with a number of her eggs in a barracuda attack, which is how Marlin comes to raise Nemo alone.

It's a heartbreaking story, but it's interesting to know that if the film was scientifically accurate, Coral would have actually been born a male, as is the case with all clownfish.

The species have the ability to change sex, so Coral would have had to do this before laying her eggs.

It's the largest and most dominant clownfish among those sharing the same sea anemone that changes into a female, after which the second largest - in this case, Marlin - develops functioning testes to fertilise the eggs laid by the now-female.

When one of the parents dies, they are replaced by the next-highest fish in the ladder.

If it's the mother who dies, the father will change sex to become the matriarch, and the next-highest fish will become the new man of the anemone.

All clown fish are born male. Credit: Pixabay
All clown fish are born male. Credit: Pixabay

So, according to the book The Extreme Life of the Sea from authors Stephen R. Palumbi and Anthony R. Palumbi, if Finding Nemo were scientifically accurate, Marlin would have changed sex to replace Coral, and Nemo would have developed functioning testes and the pair would have had incestuous children.

Upon being made aware of this alternative storyline, fans of the film were quick to express their surprise and gratitude that such events weren't included in the Pixar film.

Amid a flurry of shocked-face memes, one Twitter user wrote: "Glad that didn’t happen. Would’ve ruined the film imo."

Another commented: "You know… you don’t gotta tell me everything... some things can be left alone."

A third wrote: "Why would you try to ruin my day like this?"

Thankfully I can't imagine Disney will be following up this thread any time soon, so fans can choose to ignore the reality and instead just focus on the nice father-and-son relationship presented in the film.

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Doctor warns taping your mouth when you sleep can be dangerous after TikTok trend spreads

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A doctor has warned that the popular TikTok trend of 'mouth taping' has the potential to be very dangerous.

For those who aren't 'on the TikTok', like most of the kids these days, another trend has sprung up where people are talking about the benefits of 'mouth taping'.

As you can probably guess from the name, this is the practice of taping your mouth shut when you fall asleep, which people say helps them avoid breathing through their mouth once they've dozed off.

Fans of this TikTok trend say it helps them sleep deeper and better, while also cutting down on them snoring and improving their oral hygiene.

However, while there might be some benefits to taping your mouth shut while you sleep, there are people who have sounded a warning over the health risks.

Speaking to CNN, a sleep specialist doctor explained that people with obstructive sleep apnoea would find the TikTok trend 'very dangerous'.

Dr. Raj Dasgupta, associate professor of clinical medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, said there was 'limited evidence' of the benefits of mouth taping while the risks the trend posed to some people were incredibly clear.

Mouth taping might not be very effective, and is definitely dangerous when covering the whole mouth. Credit: Pixel-shot / Alamy Stock Photo
Mouth taping might not be very effective, and is definitely dangerous when covering the whole mouth. Credit: Pixel-shot / Alamy Stock Photo

She said: "There are many other options to address snoring beside mouth taping such as nasal strips, nasal dilators, mouth, throat and tongue exercises.

"These issues should be addressed and evaluated first before mouth taping. In my opinion, taping your mouth shut is not likely to help you sleep better."

Dr Dasgupta said that anyone intent on trying the trend should first get evaluated for sleep apnoea.

Meanwhile, a study into the effects of mouth taping found that doing it properly led to something called 'mouth puffing' where people just breathed in and out of the sides of their mouth instead.

The proper way to do mouth taping is not to cover your whole mouth horizontally like you're a kidnapping victim as that can completely block the airway.

Instead, you're supposed to have a strip of tape going vertically over your mouth to keep it shut without completely blocking it up, though the chances of 'mouth puffing' may make this a futile exercise anyway.

A few years ago, a pop singer was slated for taping her children's mouths shut while they were sleeping as there was 'no convincing body of evidence' to support the practice while there were plenty of risks involved with trouble breathing and the possibility of choking on vomit.

The idea behind mouth taping is it stops you snoring, results in a deeper sleep and brings health benefits, but it can be dangerous. Credit: tommaso altamura / Alamy Stock Photo
The idea behind mouth taping is it stops you snoring, results in a deeper sleep and brings health benefits, but it can be dangerous. Credit: tommaso altamura / Alamy Stock Photo

Mouth taping wouldn't be the first TikTok trend to end up attracting warnings over being a health hazard.

Influencers on the site tried to get people into 'perineum sunning' to extend their tan to their nether regions, but experts warned it was a 'stupid idea' which ran the risk of getting sunburn or developing skin cancer on your most sensitive areas.

Then there was 'vabbing', which involves dabbing yourself with pheromones from a part of the anatomy near to where you'd get your perineum sunning done, it didn't so much get a backlash from experts as just people in general.

People are outraged after finding out new Scooby-Doo series doesn't include Scooby-Doo

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Many fans of Scooby-Doo are outraged that the new series in the universe will not feature Scooby-Doo himself.

Velma is set to release on HBO Max in 2023, but has faced heavy backlash since details on its casting were revealed.

Scooby-Doo does not feature at all in the series and Shaggy will be referred to his real name, Norville Rogers.

The new series will see a change in the portrayal of Shaggy as a Black male, and the character will be voiced by Emmy nominee Sam Richardson, while the character will be named Norville.

Many have praised its makers for introducing diversity into the classic characters, but others are not happy that Scooby is not included at all.

This was echoed by TikTok creator Brittany Venti who shared her thoughts on the Velma series on her channel.

She said: "No one has a problem with there being Black characters, it's a problem when you take original characters, and you completely change them.

"This isn't even Scooby-Doo anymore, it doesn't even include Scooby-Doo.

"It's not only they are taking something as we know it and completely changing it and gutting it of what we know it as.

"Another point of contention I have not seen discussed yet, why do we feel it is appropriate to take a children's TV show and politicise it.

Scooby-Doo is not in the Velma series. Credit: Moviestore Collection Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo
Scooby-Doo is not in the Velma series. Credit: Moviestore Collection Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo

"You are taking the focus away from the show and bringing the focus to race and politicising a children's show."

Despite Venti's views, Mindy Kaling, the actor who plays Velma in the series, is unbothered by the show's negative reaction.

Speaking at Velma's New York Comic-Con panel, she said: "I think of the characters in this as so iconic, but in no way is the gang defined by their whiteness, except for Fred.

"So, I was a little bit surprised, and I think most Indian-American girls when they see this skeptical, hardworking, kind of under-appreciated character, can identify with her."

Creators are mixing up the Scooby-Doo formula. Credit: Tim Gainey / Alamy Stock Photo
Creators are mixing up the Scooby-Doo formula. Credit: Tim Gainey / Alamy Stock Photo

At the same panel, Velma's showrunner Charlie Grandy discussed the decision to omit Scooby-Doo from the show.

He said: "When we were going into the show and thinking about adapting it, we wanted to be respectful.

"We didn’t want to just kind of take these beloved characters and put them in outrageous or gross situations and say, ‘Isn’t it crazy you did that to Velma?'

"We couldn’t get a take on it that was like, ‘How do we kind of do this in a fun, modern way?'

"That felt like what made it a kid show was, Scooby-Doo."

People Fuming At 'Bizarrely Sexist’ Lyrics Kids Were Asked To Sing For Mothers Day

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People have been left fuming over an ‘offensive’ and ‘sexist’ Mother’s Day song a school gave its pupils to sing. 

Posting on Twitter, the auntie of a pupil at the school wrote that her five-year-old niece was given the 'bizarrely sexist' song to sing for Mother’s Day.

She included a snap of the lyrics to the song, which include: “My mum’s really an angel/ She’s great at caring for me/ She does the cleaning and shopping/ And she makes a wonderful tea,” and “She may not have a degree/ But she can help with my homework."

The song the kids were given to sing. Credit: Twitter/Sophie Hill
The song the kids were given to sing. Credit: Twitter/Sophie Hill

The tweet has sparked outrage, with one Twitter user saying she was ‘appalled’ and another branding it ‘offensive’. 

Someone else wrote: “I’m struggling with the sheer number of levels on which this is wrong.

“Also, shout to the kids who don’t have a mother, or who have neglectful or abusive mothers.”

Another person commented: “Two main problems: the sexism and the assumption that everyone has a mum.”

While a third said: “It's reinforcing gender stereotypes, that belong in the bin, to young, impressionable children.”

The company behind the poem, Out of the Ark Music, said it no longer promotes the song and encourages schools to use one of their newer pieces. 

In a statement on its website, Out of the Ark Music said: "We are aware that the songs ‘My Mum’ and ‘My Dad’, published by Out of the Ark Music many years ago, have been the cause for some concern and for that we are truly sorry.

Primary school children. Credit: Alamy
Primary school children. Credit: Alamy

"We recognise that the lyrics in the songs are outdated and don’t reflect the invaluable and different roles mothers and fathers play within society and within families. They also do not represent our current values and ethos as a company.

"For a number of years now we have not promoted these songs, taken them out of our new digital platform and have proactively communicated with schools to suggest free alternatives.

"As a business we work hard to instil wholesome values in every song we write, but we recognise that times change, and as result we regularly audit our songs to ensure these values are upheld. Unfortunately, we can't remove printed product that was sold and is still in circulation.

"We will continue to promote and encourage the use of alternatives to these specific songs."

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